Content Strategy Forum 2010

Thursday, 15 April 2010

CS Forum 2011 ↗ 


Program Overview

Workshop Day - Thursday, 15 April 2010

08:30-09:00

Registration and Coffee

09:00-12:30

Content Strategy: Purpose and Practice

Kristina Halvorson
Brain Traffic

Content Analysis

Rachel Lovinger
Razorfish

Karen McGrane
Bond Art + Science

12:30-14:00

Lunch

14:00-17:30

Practical Applications of Content Strategy in the Workplace

Rahel Anne Bailie
Intentional Design, Inc.

The Evolution of Content

Elizabeth McGuane
iQ Content

Randall Snare
iQ Content

19:30-22:30

River Boat Dinner Cruise

Main Conference Day - Friday, 16 April 2010

08:00-09:00

 Registration and Coffee

09:00-09:10

Welcome Remarks

09:10-09:50

Morning Keynote:
Content Strategy: A Framework for Managing Content throughout its Lifecycle

Rahel Anne Bailie
Intentional Design, Inc.

10:00-10:45

Evaluating Content: It’s a Corporate Essential and a Content Strategy Foundation Stone

Clare O'Brien
CDA

Content Strategy and Information Architecture in Europe and European Projects

Sylvie Daumal
Duke Razorfish

In Plain Language and In Plain Sight Around the Globe

Deborah Bosley
The Plain Language Group

10:45-11:15

Break - Exhibitor & Student Showcase

Sponsor Spotlight: Quark

11:15-12:00

A “Do It Yourself” Guide to Content Strategy

Jonathan Kahn
Together London

Do we « Speak » Content Strategy in France?

Muriel Vandermeulen
We Are the Words

Exploring Editorial Strategy

Jeff MacIntyre
Predicate

12:00-14:00

Lunch - Book Raffle

14:00-14:40

Afternoon Keynote:
Banging the Big Drums

Kristina Halvorson
Brain Traffic

14:50-15:35

Designing a Holistic Customer Experience

Joyce Hostyn
Open Text

Localisation in Your Content Strategy

Kenneth Yau
Baddit Ltd.

Content Analysis: Know Thy Content

Colleen Jones
Content Science

15:35-16:05

Break - Exhibitor & Student Showcase

Sponsor Spotlight: Quark

16:05-16:50

The Writing on the Wall: Content Strategy at Facebook

Sarah Cancilla
Facebook

There’s No Semantic Web without Content and Data

Rachel Lovinger
Razorfish

Mobile Content: The Return of Shovelware?

Erin Scime
HUGE

17:00-18:30

Panel Session:
Content Strategy in Europe

Jeff MacIntyre (moderator), Clare O'Brien, Sylvie Daumal, Jonathan Kahn, Elizabeth McGuane

 18:30-19:00

Break - Exhibitor & Student Showcase

19:00-20:00

Closing Cocktail - Chocolate Raffle

As the Forum wraps up, you can wind down at the closing cocktail hour. Exchange your completed conference evaluation form for a Golden Ticket and entry into our free chocolate prize draw.

Workshop Details

Content Strategy: Purpose and Practice

Kristina Halvorson
Brain Traffic

What is "content strategy"? Go ahead. Pick a definition. This practice (in one form or another) has been around for more than a decade, but somehow we haven't quite agreed on what it is, how it should work, and why it really matters.

One thing everyone does agree on: Dealing with web content is hard. It's complicated, expensive, time-consuming, and often overwhelming. There's new content. Legacy content. User-generated content. Print to web. Text to video. Static to dynamic. The list goes on and on.

But who's responsible for wrangling all this content into submission? Agencies want the client to do it, but the client doesn't have the necessary infrastructure to plan for and execute user-centered content. The client wants the agency to do it, but the agency doesn't have the subject matter expertise—let alone the internal resources—required create content that's always accurate, relevant, and consistent over time.

Good news: The practice of content strategy gives us tools and processes that can help bring order out of your content chaos. But before we can sell our organizations on investing time and money in content strategy, we need to help stakeholders understand exactly how content can make or break user experience, and what the costs are when we wait until the 11th hour to deal with it.

What will be covered? Content strategy is the practice of planning for the creation, delivery, and governance of useful, usable content. In this workshop, we'll learn how to:

  • Integrate content strategy responsibilities into your current web content role using a repeatable methodology
  • Conduct a quantitative and qualitative content audit
  • Structure content strategy documentation
  • Use techniques for getting stakeholders to understand and align on the business value of content strategy

Who should attend? This workshop is for anyone who's convinced that great content is central to a successful user experience and wants the tools to make it happen: Marketers, web editors and writers, user experience designers, information architects, product managers, and anyone else who deals with web content.

Content Analysis

Rachel Lovinger
Razorfish

Karen McGrane
Bond Art + Science

As digital interactions begin to permeate nearly every moment and activity of our lives, we find that we’re generating and consuming digital information at rates we couldn’t have possibly imagined just a few years ago. Interaction design is a highly-evolved discipline, but many web designers proceed with only a vague understanding of the content around which they’re designing online experiences. This is like trying to cook a meal without knowing what ingredients you have. It can result in sites that look beautiful, and may even provide fun interactions, but fail to engage long-term because they don’t effectively deliver the content that users want and need.

This workshop will provide structure and techniques for auditing and analyzing content. Karen McGrane and Rachel Lovinger will describe the kinds of things you need to know about content, explain the practices used to get the answers, and discuss the kinds of decisions that will be influenced by this information. These are skills that will help content strategy professionals add incredible value to any web development project.

Practical Applications of Content Strategy in the Workplace

Rahel Anne Bailie
Intentional Design, Inc.

Whether we’re marketing or technical communicators, we’re being asked to use and re-use our content in more inventive ways. The complexity of content production can compound once it starts converging with content from other departments, partners, or public sources. You might be at the stage where the “more” part includes methods or technologies that are unfamiliar, or where “more” means satisfying customer needs with a better content experience.

To successfully tackle a situation, it helps to have a framework in which to understand the environment and trends.

During this workshop, participants will learn about how to think about content differently, and use content to its maximum potential. We will use case studies to identify the concepts that can be put to use in the workplace. We will cover how to choose and manage content that is portable and has semantic properties, meets business requirements, and provides a better user experience.

The Evolution of Content

Elizabeth McGuane
iQ Content

Randall Snare
iQ Content

Against the backdrop of the evolution of content in the UX industry, we’ll look at how our content development process has evolved over the last two years – and how our entire design process has changed because of it.

Using practical examples from projects we’ve run, we’ll show how integrating content at the core of the design process has strengthened every part of the project – from information architecture, to interaction design, to coding and analytics – as well as improving the way we work.

We’ll also talk about how our company is moving toward an Agile development method for user experience design projects, with a core team working together in short sprints, rather than the IA, content analyst, interaction designer and visual designer working independently. 

As the UX industry has grown in Ireland, content strategy has begun to take centre stage. Other European countries may witness the same course of events. We will show how to effectively make content the foundation of the design process, using hands on practical exercises that mirror a project from start to finish. We will also talk specifically about the growing role of content strategy in the field and how it needs to integrate with other parts of the UX industry.

Social Event

River Boat Dinner Cruise

Bienvenue à bord ! Join us for a 2-hour evening cruise on the river Seine and enjoy a delicious buffet meal with splendid views of Paris' most famous monuments. See the beautifully illuminated Eiffel Tower, Musée d'Orsay, Louvre, Notre Dame Cathedral, and Pont Neuf while sipping a glass of champagne and chatting with our speakers and other conference attendees.
Date: Thursday 15 April, 7.30pm-10.30pm
Price: €70 per person

  • Priority boarding at 7.30pm from the Pont St Michel landing stage (Quai des Orfèvres) on Ile de la Cité, close to Notre Dame Cathedral. The boat is called "Paris en Scène". Cruise departs at 8pm sharp.
  • Reserved area for our group at the front of the boat with panoramic view.
  • Aperitif with a selection of salted crisps, peanuts, olives, kir crémant (sparkling wine with blackcurrent/blackberry liqueur) or a cocktail with or without alcohol. Main course served from the buffet. Selection of desserts. 2 glasses of wine and/or mineral water. Coffee.
  • Return to the landing stage at 9pm. Those who wish to get an early night can disembark. Otherwise, we stay on board for another circuit down the river.
  • Second departure at 9.30pm.
  • Reserved area for our group at the front of the boat with panoramic view.
  • Glass of champagne (or cocktail with or without alcohol).
  • Commentary is available during the cruise in 4 languages (French - English - Spanish - Italian) via individual headsets.
  • Return to the landing stage at 10.30pm.



Main Conference Presentations

Content Strategy: A Framework for Managing Content throughout its Lifecycle

Rahel Anne Bailie
Intentional Design, Inc.

Content strategy is an exciting place to be. It’s an emerging field, still open to interpretations and possibilities. As an emerging area of practice, content strategy promises to change the landscape of our work in significant ways. The definition of content strategy continues to evolve as we develop better definitions of the components that come together to form the framework that will eventually become the body of knowledge. So while single-sourcing or DITA is not, of itself, a content strategy, a content strategy could very well include these concepts.

By asserting that content strategy is the intersection of business analysis, user experience, and content development, we are laying claim to a profound change in the way we treat content. And we expect no less from the organizations that content serves. When we treat content, instead of a drain, as a corporate asset, when we look at its untapped potential instead of its cost, when we think about content in terms of consumer and corporate benefit, we are looking at content through a strategic lens.

Evaluating Content: It’s a Corporate Essential and a Content Strategy Foundation Stone

Clare O'Brien
CDA

Pre-internet content was predictable and managed by industries of specialists. It did as it was told. In these nascent post-internet days, we’re beginning to realise that pre-internet content doesn’t work online and that our audiences (markets / users) are behaving in ways we’ve no experience to predict with accuracy. But even more critical is that content value is shifting - upwards. It appears that content is at once tangibly ‘the organisation’ sought out and touched and valued by users, AND that our users are themselves generating the content that they value as useful or otherwise.

So how to judge what’s right and wrong, what works what doesn’t, what to invest in, and how to plan? CDA’s CUT Score (Content Usefulness Toolkit) is a methodology and approach that will allow us to gain real insight into the nature of content and its relationship with its intended audience and the subsequent effect on quality and value. Critically, it provides a quantitative measure of an otherwise soft target allowing organizations to evaluate online content and support budget management decisions.

I will talk about CUT’s development and outline its future application for content strategy professionals.

Content strategy and Information Architecture in Europe and European Projects

Sylvie Daumal
Duke Razorfish

Content Strategy and Information Architecture are closely tied, though certainly distinguished, at least in the US. In Europe, however, this distinction is blurred. What role is that of the information architect? By distinction, what is the role of the content strategist, if there is one? Who must be responsible for the semantic issues like nomenclature, labeling, taxonomy and metadata? The European Union already recognizes 23 languages… and European projects frequently deal with more than ten languages. Who is supposed to create nomenclature, labeling, taxonomy and metadata for all these languages? How are roles dispatched in such a context? That’s some of the issues we have to face and to fix if we want a better recognition of IA and CS in Europe.

In Plain Language and In Plain Sight Around the Globe

Deborah Bosley
The Plain Language Group

Content strategy is an emerging field of practice encompassing every aspect of content, including its design, development, analysis, presentation, measurement, evaluation, production, management, and governance. Kristina Halvorson, author of Content Strategy for the Web, defines content strategy as "the practice of planning for content creation, delivery, and governance." But content development must be guided by the needs of the audience: needs that the use of plain language can satisfy.

Plain language is defined as proven writing and design strategies that make it easy for the intended audience to understand and use the information. Despite language differences, many countries have embraced the use of plain language: South Africa’s constitution was purposely written in plain language so the people would have access to democracy; the governments of New Zealand and Australia require plain language in most public documents; and the U.S. recently has reformed its financial system and included requirements for plain language in many financial documents. Not only have some governments embraced plain language, but corporations also know that plain language increases trust and customer loyalty.

This presentation will focus on the global plain language movement by presenting examples of this initiative, supporting these claims with research, and emphasizing the importance of plain language in communicating with the public whether as citizens or consumers.

A “Do It Yourself” Guide to Content Strategy

Jonathan Kahn
Together London

You're a web professional: a designer, developer, information architect, or strategist. Your team has the web design disciplines covered: research, strategy, user experience design, standards-based development, and project management. But something's going wrong with your projects; the user experience just isn't meeting your expectations. You're reasonably sure you know why: there's a problem with the content.

You realise that your team could use some help from the discipline of content strategy, but for whatever reason, hiring a dedicated content strategist isn't a feasible option. So what can you do to add some content strategy to your projects?

Learn how web professionals can practise content strategy for ourselves, through advocacy, improved design processes, and community engagement. And when we have the luxury of a dedicated content strategist, learn how we can engage with the discipline in our everyday practice.

Do we « Speak » Content Strategy in France?

Muriel Vandermeulen

In one of Moliere's famous plays, "The Bourgeois Gentleman", Sir Jourdain discovers that "he has been speaking prose all his life, and didn't even know it!". It seems that French-speaking editorial strategists have experienced the same confusion recently...

Content strategy may have been considered as a critical emerging discipline in the English-speaking market place over the past year, but on the French-speaking one, in Europe, it has not. Why? Is it maybe because "content" as such is more often referred to as "data" in French? Or is it because when addressing issues of usable, awesome and interactive information, French information specialists do not use the word "content"? Or is it simply because we have been practicing editorial strategy from the beginning of the Web?

What lies behind the words "editorial" and "content" strategy? Are the concepts so different from one culture to another ? And do these cultural differences really impact the way we treat data and information?

Exploring Editorial Strategy

Jeff MacIntyre
Predicate

Online, everyone is a publisher--but, uh, what does it mean to be a publisher online?
It means getting an editorial strategy. As it turns out, the exploding field of interactive content strategy is inextricably linked to the history of publishing--and the future of publishing looks a lot like content strategy.

What's the value of editorial strategy? What's editorial content, anyway? How does it relate to the broader fields of content strategy and user experience design--and why should you care?

Learn from a field expert about the emerging intersection between content publishing, programming and product strategy online by studying real-world best and worst practices. This session will include an overview of the role of editorial content specialists and their key deliverables: the product strategy, editorial calendar and style guide.

Banging the Big Drums

Kristina Halvorson
Brain Traffic

In March of 2009, twenty content strategists from around the United States came together in Memphis, TN for the first on-record public meetup devoted to content strategy. It was an historic day for our field, as it sparked an international (and, today, exponentially-increasing) interest in content strategy.

Just one year later, a much larger group of "useful, usable content" advocates will gather at Content Strategy Forum 2010. At this early stage, the importance and impact of content strategy has yet to be recognized within our own organizations. If we're going to "kick-start and build a feeling of attachment, responsibility, and respect towards content" (Richard J. Ingram, "The Content Strategy Advocate"), we need all the support we can get from each other.

If you attend the Content Strategy Forum, you're joining the conversation in its very early stages. Right here, right now, we have the opportunity--and responsibility--to share our collective knowledge, no matter what our background or area of expertise. Technical communications. User experience. Publishing. Marketing. Communications. IT. Our content processes and products will only evolve if we commit to open, regular communication within our own community, as well as to ever-expanding outreach throughout the web professional industry. Tools, process, perspective, passion. It's time to bang the big drums for content strategy.

Designing a Holistic Customer Experience

Joyce Hostyn
Open Text

Customer experience is the sum of the experience a customer has with a business, across all channels and touchpoints. An experience always exists and always generates an impression, but seldom by design. No wonder only 8% of customers report their experience with a given company was superior.

What’s the problem? A product is designed in R&D then thrown ‘over the wall’ to marketing whose focus is on promotion rather than education, integration, and refinement. Product information is too often seen as a necessary evil rather than part of the larger experience. The services and sales organizations gear up to sell and service the customer, creating their own content along the way, and often in ways that are inconsistent with the R&D and marketing impressions that have already been created. Too often this silo’d approach results in fragmented experiences and dissatisfied customers.

What would happen if all these groups saw themselves as collaborators working to create a content strategy designed to deliver a superior, holistic, customer experience across all customer touchpoints and all stages of the customer lifecycle? How can we get to this ideal end state?

Localisation in Your Content Strategy

Kenneth Yau
Baddit Ltd.

If everyone speaks English nowadays, why bother with any other language? Why bother with any form of English other than US English? Is there even just one form of US English?

There is no lowest common denominator language. There is no neutral choice of language for your content. If your content serves more than one cultural group – identified by nation, language, ethnicity or even sports team affiliation – you should care about localisation.

This session will explore how to integrate localisation and internationalisation into your content strategy. Along the way, we’ll consider the importance of localisation and internationalisation, the effects of your localisation choices on how users and customers engage with your content, how localisation affects other user experience disciplines and other business functions, as well as practical considerations for your localisation process.

Content Analysis: Know Thy Content

Colleen Jones
threebrick

To know your content is to love it. Content analysis is an essential part of many user experience projects that involve existing content. Examples of such projects include migrating a Web site to a new platform or design, integrating multiple Web sites into one, or assessing Web content for reuse in a new channel. Just as you can’t nurture a garden without regularly inspecting its plants and flowers, you can’t care for your content without looking at it closely. You must become familiar with your content to judge whether it’s effective, understand how it relates to other content, identify ways to improve it, and more. This presentation will walk you through content analysis basics, offering plenty of practical tips and examples along the way.

The Writing on the Wall: Content Strategy at Facebook

Sarah Cancilla
Facebook

If Facebook were a country, it would be the third largest in the world behind China and India. Facebook’s biggest natural resource? Content. Each week, people share more than 3.5 billion pieces of content in 70 different languages.

Being bold and moving fast are core to Facebook’s organizational culture, but those aren’t concepts typically associated with content strategy. Can content strategy succeed and thrive in a risk-taking, rule-breaking culture of constant innovation? How does content strategy scale to simultaneously meet the needs of teenagers, political organizers, entrepreneurs, game-enthusiasts and grandmothers worldwide?

When more than 99.9% of content is user-generated, what’s there to strategize about anyway?

Join Sarah Cancilla for an inside peek at what it means to practice content strategy at one of the most popular destinations on the Web.

There’s No Semantic Web without Content and Data

Rachel Lovinger
Razorfish

In 2001, Time Berners-Lee laid out a vision of the next evolution of the Web. Nearly a decade later, whether you call that evolution Semantic Web, Web 3.0, Linked Data, or the Giant Global Graph, it’s clear that change is accelerating. But the nature of that change can be confusing, because “Semantic Web” means a lot of different things to a lot of different people.

This presentation will clear up the mystery by explaining, in non-technical terms, the underlying concepts of the Semantic Web. Then we’ll explore how these concepts are being used on the web today, and where they’re going in the near future. Finally, we’ll discuss what all this means for people practicing content strategy.

Mobile Content: The Return of Shovelware?

Erin Scime
HUGE

In the 1990’s, the term “shovelware” was a way of describing how print businesses ported their content to the internet without any re-editing, reformatting or real thinking about which content type would be the best medium for their message. Today, our industry has devised standards around “webifying” content so it is useful and meaningful for the screen environment.

But now that content has a home beyond the desktop, mobile content is in danger of becoming the next form of “shovelware.” What can you do to stop this? This presentation will put more definition around mobile content and show you how to communicate the need for a mobile content strategy. To add a practical spin on the theoretical, I’ll share new research findings on mobile content and provide some insight on how to achieve a higher return on your mobile content investments.

Some questions we’ll answer:

  • How is a mobile content strategy different than a site content strategy?
  • How should the need for in-the-moment content be satisfied?
  • How do mobile design imperatives and limitations define the delivery and digestion of content?
  • How can mobile and desktop screens work together?

Panel Discussion: Content Strategy in Europe

Jeff MacIntyre (moderator), Clare O'Brien, Sylvie Daumal, Jonathan Kahn, Elizabeth McGuane

What can the state of content strategy in Europe today tell us about its future? How will European content strategists evolve and uniquely thrive at solving specific challenges? An esteemed panel representing a diverse range of European practitioners and advocates will take stock of the prospects for this field of practice: their career paths towards becoming content strategists; the growing venues for selling content strategy; and the opportunities for advocating it across national and disciplinary boundaries. As the inaugural Content Strategy Forum draws to its close, the panel and conference audience will engage in a dialogue on the sunrise of content strategy in Europe.


Speaker Profiles

Kristina Halvorson

Kristina Halvorson

Brain Traffic

Kristina Halvorson is the founder and president of Brain Traffic, a nationally-renowned agency specializing in content strategy and writing for websites. Widely recognized as one of the country’s leading content strategists, Kristina speaks regularly to audiences around the world about how to deliver useful, usable content online, where and when your customers need it most.

Kristina is the author of Content Strategy for the Web. The book helps to define the discipline and business value of content strategy, offering simple steps for introducing the discipline into the web project process. It also gives practical advice on staffing and resource allocation for web editorial roles and responsibilities.

When she’s not traveling the country making the case for better web content, Kristina can be found hanging out at the Brain Traffic offices in Minneapolis, or chasing after her two kids in St. Paul, Minnesota.

Rachel Lovinger

Rachel Lovinger

Razorfish

As a Content Strategy Lead at Razorfish, Rachel is interested in connecting users with the quality content they want and need. She develops processes, best practices and innovative ideas for Fortune 500 companies looking to use digital content in more meaningful ways. She also started Razorfish’s Semantic Web Affinity Group.

Before Razorfish, Rachel worked in online publishing and web development at Time Inc. She defined and designed content categorization strategies and tools which are currently in use on sites such as EW.com and People.

Rachel wrote the foundational article Content Strategy: The Philosophy of Data, and she has spoken on the topics of Metadata, Semantic Technology and Content Strategy at conferences in the US and Europe. Rachel is interested in relevance, findability, signification, and inherently funny words, and, like most Content Strategists, she was doing content strategy long before she realized it was an actual field.

Karen McGrane

Karen McGrane

Bond Art+Science

Karen has been making the internet a better place since 1995. As a Senior Partner at Bond Art + Science, she provides user experience design, information architecture, and content strategy services to clients like Fast Company, The Atlantic, and Fiduciary Trust.

Prior to joining Bond, Karen went from being the first information architect hired at Razorfish to being the VP and National Lead for User Experience. Over the 10 years she spent there, she led projects for dozens of clients, including The New York Times, Condé Nast, Disney, and Citibank.

Karen is on the faculty of the new MFA in Interaction Design program at SVA in New York, where she teaches Interaction Design History, focusing on the key movements and trends that have shaped the field.

She is also an active participant in the User Experience community and a frequent speaker at conferences, including SIGCHI, the ASIST Information Architecture Summit, and From Business to Buttons. She has also contributed to several Forrester reports on developing personas, and is a former editor of the AIGA publication Gain, focused on the intersection of design and business.

Karen received an M.S. in Technical Communication from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, focusing her research and studies on interface design and usability.

Rahel Anne Bailie

Rahel Anne Bailie

Intentional Design

Rahel Anne Bailie, founder of Vancouver, BC-based Intentional Design Inc, is a content strategist who brings to her work a diverse skill set that spans the fields of content development, content management, and user experience, to help organizations articulate their strategic content needs. Rahel understands the complexities of content structure and flow throughout its lifecycle, and between the various content types, and uses that to match business requirements to user need. She embraces technologies that serve to improve the performance of communication products and the processes to create and maintain them. She is a Fellow of the Society of Technical Communication, and holds memberships in related professional associations, such as CM Pros, UPA, and IAI, to keep current in pertinent practice areas.

Elizabeth McGuane

Elizabeth McGuane 

iQ Content

Elizabeth McGuane is a Senior Content Analyst at iQ Content. Elizabeth has been managing content development projects at iQ Content since 2007, working with clients like Hibernian Aviva, Vodafone, The Road Safety Authority and ESB (Electricity Supply Board).  She has been instrumental in changing the way content projects are run at iQ Content, campaigning to make it an integrated part of the enitre project phase and make the design process more content-informed.

She has led public and private training courses in writing for the web and writing to sell.  Last year she co-created a new course with Randall Snare called ‘Usable Language’ that looks at the role of writing and content in all aspects of the design process.  She co-manages our internal publications department, covering the blog, features and industry reports.  She began her career in journalism, as an arts and business contributor for the Sunday Business Post, and freelancer for other national newspapers.

Outside the office, she is helping to organise the first Refresh Dublin event, an effort to promote integration across web design and interactive media industries.  Born in Ireland and raised in Nova Scotia, Canada, Elizabeth studied English at University College Dublin and the University of Toronto.  She also holds a Diploma in Journalism from the UK Press Association.

Randall Snare

Randall Snare

iQ Content

Randall Snare is a Content Analyst at iQ Content. Randall joined iQ in 2008, coming from New York, where she worked for Condé Nast Online. She was the web producer for online versions of their magazines, including Glamour, Gourmet and Self. She also worked for the online version of the food magazine Every Day with Rachel Ray, and was a freelance food writer for The Onion. Her background spans beyond web and writing, to science. Her undergraduate biology collaborative thesis in neurological endocrinology was published in the journal of Behavioral Neuroscience in 2008.

At iQ, Randall runs content development projects for clients including NUI Galway, Engineers Ireland, and permanent tsb, which includes creating information architecture, writing and editing content and training clients in best practice web writing skills and web governance. She also co-manages our publications department, is the editor of the iQ blog, and is part of the team that is developing the new iqcontent.com.

She is originally from New Orleans, and loves travelling—a recent favourite was to Sri Lanka—and writing. She continues to freelance for Irish publications including The Dubliner, and also writes fiction--for which she has won several awards--and reads at literary and cultural events around Dublin.

Clare O'Brien

Clare O'Brien

Content Delivery & Analysis

Clare O’Brien, managing director of CDA (Content Delivery & Analysis), is a marketing and communications specialist who with her co-founder, Anne Caborn, has been developing the practice of digital communications and content strategy in the UK since 2004. CDA consults on a wide range of content strategy areas such as planning, editorial strategy, findability, resource, language, measurement and modelling, also providing workshop-centred training and skills development for internal teams and board-level briefing and steering sessions. CDA’s clients include: RBS, BP, P&G, CBI, Terrapinn, smartFOCUS, Goldshield, The BBC and CIPD.

Before establishing CDA, Clare was a leading PR practitioner, serving the print and publishing sectors before branching into the IT and eventually internet sectors. Former clients such as Linotype, DuPont and Adobe sustained her interest in technology and eventually led to handling the PR for the launch of AOL in the UK when there were less than 200K home modems installed. She then went on to head the European marketing operation for the BSA, the anti-piracy association of the global software industry. As a marketing & communications consultant, Clare worked for companies such as Macromedia, Mongrel Channels, Associated Newspapers and educational publisher, Nelson Thornes.

Clare’s principle aim is to ensure that content strategy is developed as a robust and defensible business discipline with independent budget responsibility and ultimately a seat on the board.

Sylvie Daumal

Sylvie Daumal

Duke Razorfish

Sylvie Daumal is an Information Architect. She has been working at Duke Razorfish, in Paris, for the last two years. She is involved in European-scaled digital projects, taking care of the overall user experience according to a holistic approach and dealing with content strategy, user’s journeys, interaction as well as business issues, for clients like Levi’s, IOC, Nike or Sanofi-aventis.

Sylvie is helping to advance the UCD movement in France; she is part of the EuroIA Summit committee, and gives courses at Sorbonne (Celsa) and Sciences Po Paris. She is also a member of the Paris IxDA local leader.

Deborah Bosley

Deborah Bosley

The Plain Language Group

As Principal in The Plain Language Group and professor at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Deborah S. Bosley, Ph.D, believes that good writing is good business and good citizenship.  For twenty years, she has helped corporations, government agencies, and non-profits create documents that are easy to read and understand. She creates plain language documents, converts existing materials into plain language, and trains employees to write more effectively. Dr. Bosley has worked with Fortune 100/500 companies primarily in the financial and health sectors.

She has given hundreds of presentations in the U.S., Mexico, England, Spain, Ireland, Germany, and France and is the author of three books and two dozen articles on clear communication. Dr. Bosley has won four national awards for her articles, teaching,  and plain language work for TIAA-CREF. She also was a panelist on Get Noticed: Writing Effective Financial Privacy Notices sponsored by the Federal Trade Commission and the Securities Exchange Commission. She serves on the boards of the Center for Plain Language in Washington, D.C., the Shareholder’s Communications’ Forum, and The Association for Professional Communications Consultants.

In 2009, she was interviewed for the U.S. media: Wall Street Journal This Weekend radio broadcast, Transaction World, Investment News, the Omaha Herald, the Pittsburgh Post Gazette, and the New Jersey Star Ledge to discuss plain language in business including the requirement for plain language in many financial disclosures (e.g., the new credit card bill).

Jonathan Kahn

Jonathan Kahn

Together London

Jonathan Kahn is a web developer, user experience designer, and strategist. His ?rst professional web gig was in the bad old days of 1998, but since then he's become an advocate of web standards, user-centred design, and content strategy. He founded Together London, a collaborative, user-centred web design agency, in 2008.

Jonathan read Government and Economics at the London School of Economics, which he insists was an ideal grounding for a career in web design. He specialises in explaining the complex topics of code, standards, servers, and web browsers in non-technical language, enabling team members to make informed decisions without having to decipher the jargon.

Jonathan writes about the business of making websites at his personal site, lucid plot. He has also written for the illustrious A List Apart magazine.

Jonathan has built standards-based websites and content management systems for clients including Grosvenor, Royal Bank of Scotland, PwC, the UK Department for International Development, the Man Booker Prize, and Bold & Noble.

Muriel Vandermeulen

Muriel Vandermeulen

We are the Words

Muriel Vandermeulen is owner of--and senior consultant and trainer at--We Are the Words (WAW), a Brussels based agency specializing in digital content usability and editorial strategy. WAW has been developing the practice of digital information and communication in Belgium and France since 2002, with 3 main fields of action: information architecture, user experience and editorial strategy. Muriel consults on a wide range of editorial and content strategy issues, such as planning and optimizing content lifecycles; developing and customizing editorial tools; optimizing authoring and editing flows; performing editorial and usability benchmarks; and providing multilingual content, and editorial and usability charts.

Muriel has provided training, workshops, and presentations for major national and international institutions, ministries, charities, companies and non-profit organizations. WAW's clients include: Cefic, European Parliament, Eurocontrol, French Ministry of Education, Belgian Ministries of Justice/of Employment/of Interior, Belgian Privacy Commission, Groupe Le Monde, as well as for multinationals such as Meda-Pharma, Unilever, SCA Packaging, Dexia, Groupe Suez, and major training centers such as European institutions, Kluwer Belgium, IHECS (Brussels) and CFPJ (Paris).
 
Before concentrating on digital information, Muriel had been leading a copywriting and translation agency for nearly 10 years. Her clients were: Arthur D. Little International, Atlas Copco, AXA, Belgacom, Dexia, European Commission, European Training Foundation, ING, Pfizer, Unicef, ...

Jeff MacIntyre

Jeff MacIntyre

Predicate

Jeffrey MacIntyre (@jeffmacintyre) is the principal of Predicate, a New York-based content and editorial strategy consultancy for digital publishers.

He is an expert in the intersection of content publishing, programming and product strategy online. A widely noted content strategist with 10 years' experience in both professional services and digital, print and broadcast media, Jeff has worked with premier media properties (at Conde Nast, Yahoo!, A&E, Reuters, and the Washington Post Company), design agencies (at Schematic, Razorfish, HUGE, and Blast Radius) and leading authorities in user experience design to create effective content strategies.

Jeff is a prolific speaker and commentator on content strategy through his linkblog (@PredicateLLC), the community knol and conferences internationally. He also writes on online content and technology for publications including the New York Times, Wired and Slate.

He lives with his wife, cat and a self-replenishing case of wine in Brooklyn.

Joyce Hostyn

Joyce Hostyn

OpenText

Joyce Hostyn is Director Customer Experience at Open Text, the largest independent provider of ECM software and solutions. Joyce holds a Master's in Communications and Cultural Studies and 20 years experience in the fields of design, communications, and content development. Her current focus is on defining what it means to deliver a holistic, intelligent customer experience throughout the customer lifecycle. She's an avid gardener and the bane of her neighbor whose mental model of yards centers on grass.

Kenneth Yau

Kenneth Yau

Baddit

Kenneth Yau is a Content Strategist, providing content strategy and content management services through his own company, Baddit Ltd.

From 2007 to 2009, Kenneth led the content team at eBay UK. While in this role, he led the development and implementation of the eBay UK tone of voice guidelines, which were adopted across the EU. He also successfully extended the content team’s remit and influence so that it was consulted from design to delivery of site changes, as well as being consulted by marketing on customer communications.

Kenneth’s last role at eBay was as a senior member of the EU content team responsible for originating English source content suitable for translation for the eBay EU markets.

Kenneth’s career path has taken him from management consultancy, programme office management, project and programme management, knowledge base coordination, training management and delivery, photography, freelance writing, and finally to content.  He has worked for companies including Price Waterhouse, Ernst & Young, and Nestlé, serving clients as varied as national government departments and factory floor managers.  He is also a qualified management accountant (CIMA).

Kenneth’s greatest achievement is, and always will be, his daughter Amélie.

Colleen Jones

Colleen Jones

Content Science

Colleen Jones is the founder and principal of Content Science, a results-driven content strategy consultancy.  She is a pioneer in the fields of content strategy and user experience, having guided strategic initiatives for large global brands such as The Home Depot, Phillips, and InterContinental Hotels Group.
 
Jones has a wealth of experience, holding past leadership positions at threebrick, which she co-founded; Spunlogic (now Engauge Digital); the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC); and Cingular Wireless (now AT&T).
 
She holds a B.A. in English and technical writing and an M.A. in technical communication from James Madison University. Jones is currently Chair of CHI*Atlanta and a notable author on content strategy and user experience. You can follow her on Twitter at http://twitter.com/leenjones.

Sarah Cancilla

Sarah Concilla

Facebook

Sarah Cancilla has spent the past decade developing communication frameworks for some of the most popular destinations on the Web. As Facebook Content Strategist, Sarah is dedicated to ensuring that the thousands of content pieces generated by the company enhance the billions of content pieces generated by users. She is also plotting ways to scale content development to keep pace with the evolving needs of 350 million active users. Before joining Facebook, Sarah was a Lead Content Strategist at eBay, where she designed content solutions for a variety of products and spearheaded the integration of customer support content into the product life cycle. Previously, Sarah was a Senior Editor at Ask Jeeves (now Ask.com). Sarah is a longtime resident of the San Francisco Bay Area. She holds a bachelor’s degree in comparative literature from Haverford College.

Erin Scime

Erin Scime

HUGE

Erin Scime is a Brooklyn-based Senior Content Strategist currently working at HUGE. She arrived to the discipline through studies and work in curatorial studies and information science. She has created unique content business solutions for clients such as Ford Motor Company, NBC-iVillage, History.com, NutriSystem and Houselogic.com (National Association of Realtors).

Her approach to Content Strategy is founded on principles of good curatorship; with an end goal of creating smarter content experiences that have longevity and practical use. This process includes: thoughtful examination of current holdings, organization, effective messaging and structure to make content work long after its initial launch. Her writing can be found at http://www.dopeData.com.